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What's so good?
By Lori Kay | Jun 20, 2012 | Total plays: 12,164

Within the past few months, Steve Vaynshtok has composed his project AbdeCaf from the bits of inspiration left over from a punk-band breakup. He is now on the brink of breaking into the limelight, and it's here we're introduced: a Ukrainian born, Miami raised 20-year-old who is aggressively heaving through the music scene in this metropolis. Steve is tinkering endlessly in and out of the studio, already working on his next EP projected for public ears by August, amidst what seems to be a hectic festival-to-festival schedule this summer.

"Mecca" is a brief departation from the hollower, echoing songs of his repertoire, as it dances with a chiming xylophone-mimicking chord that is muffled briefly by subversive bass. The captivating element that lies within these three and a half minutes is something that you wont hear of very often. As I noticed these chiming notes dance through through my headphones, I couldnt help but realize that they were so gentle, yet immobilizing. And after a few hours of research, friends, I am able to present you with the scientific explanation for your lightheaded and euphoric feeling!

We have two ears that are able to process sound at the same time, but what happens when one is receiving a sound off-pace with the other ear? This phenomenon is what auditory neurologists' have deemed binaural beats.

As exemplified in "Mecca," when heard through headphones, that light innocent beat traverses between our right and left ears and is actually affecting our frequency following response, that then neccesitates a manual synchronization of these differing beats by our crazed little brain. The binaural beat is the difference in hertz (a unit measuring frequency) of what is being heard in either ears.

When charted, binaural beats are shown to directly affect certain brain waves, in effect either making us more alert and cognitive or lulling us into a pre-sleep, drowsy relaxation. In the case of "Mecca," the differing bpms equate to the stimulation of the portion of our brains that help us let go, relax, and unwind.

Trust me, I'm almost a doctor.
Lori Kay
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